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THE MUFTI IN BERLIN, 1941

Record of the conversation between the Fuhrer and the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem on November 28, 1941 in the presence of Reich Foreign Minister and Minister Grobba in Berlin. Memorandum by an official of the German Foreign Minister's Secretariat. 
  
Füh. 57a. g Rs.                                    BERLIN, November 30, 1941.





“The Mufti began by thanking the Fuhrer for the great honour he had bestowed by receiving him. He wished to seize the opportunity to convey to the Fuhrer of the Greater German Reich, admired by the entire Arab world, his thanks for the sympathy which he had always shown for the Arab and especially the Palestinian cause...

In the struggle, the Arabs were striving for the independence and unity of Palestine, Syria, and Iraq. They had the fullest confidence in the Fuhrer and looked to his hand for the balm on their wounds which had been inflicted upon them by the enemies of Germany.
           
The Mufti then mentioned the letter he had received from Germany, which stated that Germany was holding no Arab territories and understood and recognized the aspirations to independence and freedom of the Arabs, just as she supported the elimination of the Jewish national home...
            
The Fuhrer then made the following statement to the Mufti, enjoining him to lock it in the uttermost depths of his heart:       

1. He (the Fuhrer) would carry on the battle to the total destruction of the Judeo-Communist empire in Europe.
             
2. At some moment which was impossible to set exactly today but which in any event was not distant, the German armies would in the course of this struggle reach the southern exit from Caucasia.
             
3. As soon as this had happened, the Fuhrer would on his own give the Arab world the assurance that its hour of liberation had arrived.  Germany's objective would then be solely the destruction of the Jewish element residing in the Arab sphere under the protection of British power. In that hour the Mufti would be the most authoritative spokesman for the Arab world. It would then be his task to set off the Arab operations which he had secretly prepared. When that time had come, Germany could also be indifferent to French reaction to such a declaration."

Source: Germany. Auswärtiges Amt. Title: Documents on German foreign policy, 1918-1945, from the archives of the German Foreign Ministry. Akten zur deutschen auswärtigen Politik. English Publisher: Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1949.



 
 

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